Last chance to see the Pumpkin Show in 2018

This entertaining show will educate you about an amazing way of gardening with no digging, no weeding and no watering.

This is the final performance in 2018 of the popular pumpkin show that has been on tour for many months and returns to the home town of Kettering.

All proceeds to the Kettering Mayor’s Charity appeal. See poster below for details and tickets.

Pumpkin Poster 29Oct2018

Click on the link above for details

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September 2018 Allotment News

Rainbow over Scott Road allotments

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Bridgstock Cup Winner 2018

The winner of our fabulous cup for the best allotment in 2018 is Pat Mullins, Scott Road. Many congratulations to Pat and his grandson Ryan who helps out on the plot. Pat has done wonders to his plot and is also a trained Master Composter, making amazing compost and growing great crops. His nickname is “The Riddler”, but that is another story…

The Runner up is Norman Elson, on Margaret Road. Well done Norman.

The Best newcomer for 2018 is Sonia Wasowska, Northfield Avenue. Well done Sonia.

Many thanks also to the Cup Judges for all of their hard work.

Come and see the Pumpkin Show

  • Want to find out how to grow amazing vegetables with no digging, weeding or watering? 
  • Want to find out more about pumpkins?
  • Want a great evening’s entertainment?

Then come to the Pumpkin Show on Friday 28 September, 7:30 pm at All Saints Church, William Street, Kettering.

 

Break-ins at Scott Road

Bad news, unfortunately. Thieves broke into Scott Road field by cutting through a very strong hardened steel gate padlock, broke shed doors and stole strimmers  lawnmowers, cultivators and other tools. (Overnight on 21-22 August and again on 29-30 August). Please be vigilant and report any suspicious activity to your stewards. Report any crimes to the Police. Please take petrol powered tools home for security rather than leaving them in sheds. Please remove sledgehammers or similar tools that might be used to break open sheds. The link to report a crime online is below – quicker than calling 101

https://www.northants.police.uk/webform/online-crime-reporting

Still time for solarisation.

The most dangerous weeds are those with seeds. These weed seeds will germinate in future years and cause a lot of hard work, so many gardeners are reluctant to put weeds with seeds on their compost heaps. A similar problem occurs with those weeds that grow back from a small piece of root. WE DISCOURAGE BURNING WEEDS, so what can we do with them?

One answer is Solarisation – using Solar Power to kill the weeds and their seeds and make them safe to compost. Solarisation is simple but requires sunny warm weather. There is hopefully still some of this weather to come in September, especially if we have an “Indian Summer”.

How to use Solarisation to kill weeds – simply put the weeds in a thin layer on top of some cardboard and cover them with clear polythene (plastic). The plastic layer will trap the sun’s heat just like a greenhouse or a car on a sunny day. This heat will kill the weeds, their seeds and roots and make them safe to compost. You can also use large clear polythene bags to solarise weeds, just put the weeds in the bags, seal them up and leave them in the sun.

Data manager

We are delighted to announce that we have a new officer on the committee. Our Data Manager will help to maintain our records and ensure we remain compliant with the new data protection laws (GDPR). Our Data Manager is Ilona Bickle who is well versed in GDPR and has excellent IT skills to be able to manage our data. You may well be contacted by Ilona to check that our records are accurate and up to date. If your contact details have changed, please let us know using CONTACTon the main menu on this website, or use this link

http://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk/allotmentcontact.html

Thanks Rob!

Once again, our thanks go out to another member who has volunteered and helped our fields. Robert was able to fix one of the gates at Scott Road, so they open much more smoothly. Thanks again to all those members who help each other and do great service to our society. It is most appreciated.

Time to tidy your plot.

As Autumn draws near, it is a great time to tidy your plot. Crop residues and weeds can be composted and other recyclable waste taken home to your blue bin. Non recyclable items can be taken to your black bin. We discourage burning and bonfires – see our guidelines on this on our websitehttp://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk/bonfires.html

If each of us took a bag of rubbish home this month to bin, then our allotment fields will look much neater and tidier in the coming months. Take another look at your plot, are there any items that you really don’t need and should be binned? Please take them home and bin them!

Spot your plot?

Some of our members have taken photos from flying drones. You have a chance to see a bird’s eye view of our fields. See if you can spot your plot…

DCIM/100MEDIA/DJI_0051.JPGDCIM100MEDIADJI_0017.JPG

Finally, a sunset over Scott Road

DCIM/100MEDIA/DJI_0074.JPG

Vacancy for new service role

Vacancy – a service opportunity to be our first

Data Manager

The committee is seeking to appoint a data manager for our society. The appointment is initially until April 2019, thereafter the post is reappointed on an annual basis, in the same way as field stewards. There is a small annual allowance for expenses (£30) plus a rent-free plot.

For more information or to express and interest, please contact the secretary.

Full details and a job description are available on our website at the following page

http://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk/Datamanager.html

 

June 2018 Allotment News

Not much news (a good thing in June)

This time of year the weeds (and hopefully our crops) are growing rapidly and allotment gardeners are very busy. Perhaps it is a good thing that there is not too much to report, as we need as much time as possible to tend our plots.

Also, there is a lot of truth in the saying that “no news is good news”

Investment in Margaret Road

One piece of good news is that the committee has bought Heras panels to reinforce the fence at Margaret Road. This method has previously been successful at the Scott Road field. The idea is that in the medium to long term we can grow brambles in between the wires of these panels. The combination of metal fence and thorny bramble is very effective for security.

Therefore is your plot is on a fence boundary at Margaret Road, please allow brambles to grow through the fence and in between the metal mesh. Please do not cut any existing brambles that are on the boundary fence. This will help your security as well as everyone else’s. If you need any help or have any comments on this, please contact your field steward.

Field stewards appointed

Our constitution and committee structure is such that the field stewards are appointed by the committee every year. The names of the stewards for each field are listed below. Please contact your steward in the first instance if you have a query, suggestion, problem etc. You are always welcome to contact us directly (see contact us) if you have news or suggestions.

Margaret Road – Tony Munt, Sue Munt, Lee Farmer, Claire Wallis

Northfield Avenue – Harry Pope (there is a vacancy for a second steward)

Windmill Avenue – George White, Ilona Bickle

Scott Road – Chris Hulston, Pat Mullins, Russell Attwood

Slug Patrol

We have warm and wet weather and planted our young tender vegetables, so perfect condition for slugs. Do you have any advice or tips for slug control? Let us know your preferred method.

Rats at Windmill Avenue

We are aware that there was a rat problem at Windmill Avenue earlier in the Spring. Please accept our assurances that rigorous control measures are in place. Many rats have been caught and disposed of and extreme vigilance is being maintained to eliminate the problem altogether. Many thanks to the stewards and members at Windmill Avenue who have worked hard to solve this problem. If you spot a rat, please inform your steward. Please make sure that your plot does not have places for shelter or food that might encourage rats.

AGM notice – Wednesday 14 March

http://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk/agm.html

KETTERING ALLOTMENTS

the 100th

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

of the members of the above association will be held at the

CORN MARKET HALL

KETTERING

Wednesday March 14th 2018

at 7-45 pm.

To receive the committee report for the year ended 31st December 2017 and the balance sheet as of that date, to elect officers and to transact the general business of the association.

The following members of the committee retire and are eligible for re-election: –

H Pope, G White, M Ozdemir, I Bickle

Proposed new rule


If rent has not been paid by the 1st February and a member wishes to continue the tenancy, then a non-refundable advance payment will be required of a further year’s rent

Further nominations or proposals should reach the secretary by Wednesday 28 February 2018

***************************************************************************

R.Attwood, Secretary

http://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk

February 2018 Allotment News — russellattwood

Seedy Saturday on February 17th in Northampton https://www.facebook.com/events/786746508195316/ from 10am – 4pm at Castle Hill United Reform Church, Doddridge Street, Northampton NN1 2RN. Entrance fee £1 Dates for your Diary – our 100th AGM 2018 AGM is on a Wednesday! A real break with tradition – (the Corn Market Hall was not available on our […]

via February 2018 Allotment News — russellattwood

February 2018 Allotment News

Seedy Saturday on February 17th in Northampton

https://www.facebook.com/events/786746508195316/

from 10am – 4pm at Castle Hill United Reform Church, Doddridge Street, Northampton NN1 2RN. Entrance fee £1

Dates for your Diary – our 100th AGM

2018 AGM is on a Wednesday!

A real break with tradition – (the Corn Market Hall was not available on our usual Tuesday)

This is our 100th AGM! – on

Wednesday 14th March at 7:45pm at Corn Market Hall

More details on our website – link below

http://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk/agm.html

Bagged Alpaca Manure for Sale

Bags of alpaca manure, commonly referred to as ‘Black Gold’ for sale.

Alpaca manure is said to be one of the richest organic manures available, with high levels of nitrogen and potassium. It does not need to be composted before using and can be placed directly on or around even the most delicate plants.

Bags weigh approximately 12lb and I charge £1 per bag, collection is from Broughton.  To arrange purchase, contact Rachel either via email or on 07590 610056. email address

rmoss@live.co.uk

Other manure available – see website

For other suppliers of manure, see our website page

http://www.ketteringallotments.co.uk/manure.html

To dig or not to dig, that is the question

To dig or not to dig, that is the question. Whether it is nobler for the veg for soil to suffer the outrageous fortune of spades and forks, or to take up mulching against a sea of weeds and by smothering end them?”

No doubt if Hamlet had an allotment he would be pondering this dilemma. Several of our members have reported interest in the “no-dig” gardening methods as extolled by Charles Dowding. There is a lot of information on his website

https://www.charlesdowding.co.uk

The evidence is strong that “no-dig” give better crops, is better for the soil and easier than digging or rotovating. The TV programme Beechgrove Garden also did a trial last year and found the vegetables in the “no-dig” plot were bigger than the dug plot.

See page 7 of the factsheet (link below)

http://www.beechgrove.co.uk/module_uploads/2/Factsheet_2017_-_Prog_18.pdf

So perhaps it is a case of “mulchers of Kettering unite, you have nothing to lose except your spades”

But let’s leave the final words to the poet Seamus Heaney

Digging

BY SEAMUS HEANEY

Between my finger and my thumb   

The squat pen rests; snug as a gun.

Under my window, a clean rasping sound   

When the spade sinks into gravelly ground:   

My father, digging. I look down

Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds   

Bends low, comes up twenty years away   

Stooping in rhythm through potato drills   

Where he was digging.

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft   

Against the inside knee was levered firmly.

He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep

To scatter new potatoes that we picked,

Loving their cool hardness in our hands.

By God, the old man could handle a spade.   

Just like his old man.

My grandfather cut more turf in a day

Than any other man on Toner’s bog.

Once I carried him milk in a bottle

Corked sloppily with paper. He straightened up

To drink it, then fell to right away

Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods

Over his shoulder, going down and down

For the good turf. Digging.

The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap

Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge

Through living roots awaken in my head.

But I’ve no spade to follow men like them.

Between my finger and my thumb

The squat pen rests.

I’ll dig with it.

seedysatposter2018-4